US President Barack Obama (AFP photo)
The campaign of US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump says the policies of President Barack Obama and former secretary of state Hillary Clinton led to the death of Army Captain Humayun Khan, despite the fact that Khan died in June 2004.
“It was under Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton that changed the rules of engagement that probably cost his life,” Trump’s spokeswoman Katrina Pierson said in an interview Tuesday with CNN.
Khan, a Muslim American soldier, was killed in Iraq during the first term of Republican President George W. Bush, while Obama was still a state senator in Illinois.  
Humayun Khan, 27, was killed in a car bombing attack in Iraq and was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.
Khan is the son of Khizr Khan, who last week blasted Trump as unpatriotic and selfish in a speech at the Democratic National Convention over the billionaire’s statements against immigrants and Muslims.
Khizr Khan, whose son Humayun Khan died in Iraq in 2004, speaks during the final day of the Democratic National Convention on July 28, 2016 at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (AFP photo)
Trump responded, in part, by suggesting that Ghazala Khan, the mother of the soldier, was silent during her husband’s speech at the DNC because she was not “allowed” to speak.
Trump’s comments attracted rebuke from both sides of the aisle and intensified calls for Republican leaders to distance themselves from the White House contender.
On Sunday, Trump’s vice presidential nominee, tried to calm down the situation by saying that both he and Trump believe Khan “is an American hero and his family, like all Gold Star families, should be cherished by every American.”
However, he also blamed Obama and Democratic presidential nominee Clinton for the “disastrous decisions” that led to the death of Captain Humayun Khan in Iraq.
On Tuesday, Trump said he does not regret his comments on the family of Khan. "I don’t regret anything."
US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump addresses supporters during a campaign rally on August 1, 2016 in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. (AFP photo)
"I said nice things about the son and I feel that very strongly but of course I was hit very hard from the stage and you know it’s just one of those things but no I don’t regret anything,” he said.
In March 2003, the US and Britain invaded Iraq in blatant violation of international law and under the pretext of finding WMDs; but no such weapons were ever discovered in Iraq.
More than one million Iraqis were killed as the result of the US-led invasion, and subsequent occupation of the country, according to the California-based investigative organization Project Censored.
US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump says he does not regret his comments on the family of Captain Humayun Khan, a Muslim American soldier killed in Iraq in 2004.
Trump belittled the parents of Khan, whose father addressed the Democratic National Convention last Thursday night after he denounced the business mogul as unpatriotic and selfish over his divisive rhetoric against immigrants and Muslims.
Trump responded, in part, by suggesting that Ghazala Khan, the mother of the soldier, was silent during her husband’s speech at the DNC because she was not “allowed” to speak.
In an interview with ABC7 on Tuesday, Trump said, "I don’t regret anything."
"I said nice things about the son and I feel that very strongly but of course I was hit very hard from the stage and you know it’s just one of those things but no I don’t regret anything."
Humayun Khan, 27, was killed in a 2004 car bombing attack in Iraq and was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.Trump’s comments attracted rebuke from both sides of the aisle and intensified calls for Republican leaders to distance themselves from the White House contender.
President Barack Obama criticized Trump and Republicans for supporting him despite the controversies around his campaign.
“If you are repeatedly having to say, in very strong terms, that what he has said is unacceptable, why are you still endorsing him?” Obama asked during a White House news conference.
Also, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a strong Trump supporter, said it was "inappropriate" to criticize the family of Capt. Khan and other Gold Star families.
In addition, a spokesperson for Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House of Representatives, has slammed Trump's rhetoric about Muslims.

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