Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers an economic policy address detailing his economic plan at the Detroit Economic Club in Detroit, Michigan, August 8, 2016.

US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has detailed his plans to revitalize America’s economy, an attempt to refocus his campaign after a series of missteps that cost him dearly in the race against Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. 
The New York businessman said during his economy address in Detroit, Michigan, on Monday, that he was going to “jump-start” the country with a program that relies heavily on tax reform and cuts to federal regulations.
“I want to jump start America, and it won't even be that hard,” Trump told a cheering crowd at the Detroit Economic Club.
As part of his plans for the “economic renewal” of America, the real estate mogul proposed “an across-the-board income tax reduction” that would specifically benefit “low-and-middle-income Americans,” while creating “millions” of good jobs.
He said he will lower taxes for all American companies to “no more than 15 percent,” while promising “to cut regulations massively.”
Trump also devoted a significant part of his speech to manufacturing cities like Detroit which are struggling with poverty and surging crime rates as the result of an economic decline, something he blamed on excessive regulation by President Barack Obama’s administration.
The Republican nominee repeatedly warned voters that Clinton was going to continue the same “failed” policies as Obama.
“Every policy that has failed this city, and so many others, is a policy supported by Hillary Clinton,” he said. “She supports the high taxes and radical regulation that forced jobs out of your community…and the crime policies that have made you less safe.”
He also attacked both Obama and Clinton over their “agenda of tax, spend and regulate” that has given way to a “silent nation of jobless Americans.”
Policies undertaken by Obama and Clinton, as his former secretary of state, have “doubled” the national debt while increasing the number of Americans outside the labor force to a total of 94.3 million, Trump added.
Since the beginning of Obama’s presidency, some 12 million people have been added to the food stamp rolls, while 7 million more were hit by poverty, the candidate noted.
He further blasted Obama and Clinton for home ownership’s plunge to a 51-year low.
Unlike his previous speeches, Trump did not make a scene when he was interrupted by more than a dozen protesters, signaling some changes in the bombastic candidate’s behavior to prevent more bad publicity for his campaign.
Recent missteps have put Trump 8 percentage points behind Clinton in terms of nationwide support, a Washington Post-ABC News poll showed Sunday.