Demonstrators march through the streets following a rally at Marshall Park in uptown Charlotte, North Carolina, September 24, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
Angry protesters in the US city of Charlotte, North Carolina, have called on the city’s mayor and police chief to resign over their inability to end racial discrimination, an issue that was highlighted by last week’s police killing of an African-American man.
Dozens of angry protesters gathered at the city council on Monday to express their frustration with racial inequality, urging the resignation of Mayor Jennifer Roberts, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney, and members of the city council over their handling of the widespread problem.
The protesters demanded justice for Keith Lamont Scott, a 43-year-old father of seven children whose officer-involved death on September 20 ignited citywide demonstrations that have never stopped ever since.
Roberts tried to calm the situation during a three-hour session with the protesters on Monday evening.
“Our city is in an uproar, and you did not respond,” said North Carolina NAACP President Rev. Milton Williams told Roberts.
“If you can't do your job, let's find someone who can," said Darcel Chandler, an attorney.
Despite officials’ attempts to control the situation, council member Al Alston said the unrest was “getting hotter” as it was building up over decades.
Protesters demanded the abolition of a North Carolina law that bans the public release of police video from body or dashboard cameras with limited exceptions.
Police had initially refused to release footage of Scott’s shooting, saying dashboard camera and body camera footage will only be shared with the victim’s family.
However, they cave in to immense pressure on Saturday and released two edited videos which did not provide a clear view of the shooting.
Scott’s family argues that he was unarmed when officers opened fire, a claim that police has disputed.