Allegations by US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton against Russia could end up damaging ties between the two world powers, an analyst says, describing her claims on Russian hacking “dangerous political talk.”

Former counter-terrorism specialist and military intelligence officer Philip Giraldi told Press TV on Tuesday that Clinton’s accusation of Russia over interference in the US electoral process could make Washington-Moscow ties “much worse.”
On July 22, the whistle-blowing website Wikileaks published thousands of hacked emails obtained from the Democratic National Convention’s servers.
American intelligence agencies said that they had “high confidence” that the Russian government was behind the hacking.
The hacking "raises some grave questions about potential Russian interference with our electoral process," Clinton said on Monday. "We are going to have to take those threats and attacks seriously."
According to Giraldi, such a claim is an “abomination” and designed to attack GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.
“This is all being produced as a narrative to make Mr. Trump look bad,” Giraldi said.
Russia has, however, denied responsibility for hacking the emails of the DNC and a computer network used by the Clinton campaign.
“And the danger that comes from this is the fact that it makes the relationship between the United States and Russia much worse than it has to be,” Giraldi said. “And that is a very serious thing because the United States and Russia are both heavily armed and are quite capable of getting involved in something that we would all regret.”
He elaborated on the point by referring to how “upset” the Russians are about Clinton’s claims, asserting that they are “very fearful” of a potential war with the US.
“Most Americans probably realize this is just chatter; this is just political talk. But it’s very dangerous political talk because it creates an environment that can be very bad for all of us.”
The attacks caused the FBI to issue a "flash alert" to election officials nationwide earlier last month. The agency urged them to remain vigilant in the face of any similar cyber intrusions.