Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein answers questions during a press conference at the National Press Club August 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. (AFP photo)

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein has said the 9/11 terrorist attacks “provided a pretext for the wrong wars, which have only gotten us into more trouble.”
Stein made the remarks in an interview with the Des Moines Register on Sunday when Americans marked the 15th anniversary of the September, 11, 2001 attacks, also known as the 9/11 attacks, which killed nearly 3,000 people and caused about $10 billion worth of property and infrastructure damage.
US officials assert that the attacks, which killed almost 3,000 people and caused at least $10 billion in property and infrastructure damage, were carried out by al-Qaeda terrorists but many analysts say it was a false-flag operation and that Osama bin Laden was just a bogeyman for the US military-industrial complex.
Washington announced on May 2, 2011 that Bin Laden was killed in his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, by US special forces and CIA operatives.

The US national security team gathered on May 2, 2011 in the White House Situation Room to monitor the progress of the American mission to assassinate Osama bin Laden.

Stein told reporters in Iowa on Sunday that she would not have ordered the assassination of the al-Qaeda leader.
The Green Party presidential candidate stated she would have brought him to justice instead.
“I think assassinations … they’re against international law to start with and to that effect, I think I would not have assassinated Osama bin Laden but would have captured him and brought him to trial,” Stein said.
"I think all evidence certainly points to bin Laden, but the 9/11 attackers had assistance and funding and bin Laden had assistance and funding,” she stated.
"What we should have done is declare a crime against humanity and pursued it, pursued the attackers and gotten the intelligence about who was behind this," she added.
According to Dr. Kevin Barrett, a founding member of the Scientific Panel for the Investigation of 9/11, “…the chief purpose of 9/11 was to destroy the seven countries in five years that General [Wesley] Clark talked about, that were enemies or threats to Israel.”
In Clark's book, Winning Modern Wars, published in 2003, General Wesley Clark, a former 4-star US Army general, describes his conversation with a military officer in the Pentagon shortly after 9/11 regarding a plan to attack seven Middle Eastern countries in five years: "As I went back through the Pentagon in November 2001, one of the senior military staff officers had time for a chat. Yes, we were still on track for going against Iraq, he said. But there was more. This was being discussed as part of a five-year campaign plan, he said, and there were a total of seven countries, beginning with Iraq, then Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and finishing off Iran."
“This is a memo that describes how we’re going to take out seven countries in five years, starting with Iraq, and then Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and, finishing off, Iran,” General Clark told Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! in March 2007.

According to US intelligence documents released last year, in the last days of his life even Bin Laden realized that the September 11, 2001 attacks were an inside job, and were not carried out by al-Qaeda militants.
Among the Bin Laden treasure-trove, there were several books, including David Ray Griffin’s New Pearl Harbor: Disturbing Questions about the Bush Administration and 9/11, which have challenged the US government narrative on the 9/11 attacks.