US Libertarian Party presidential candidate Gary Johnson (center) and his running mate, former Massachusetts governor Bill Weld (right), talking to CBS News.

US Libertarian Party presidential candidate Gary Johnson says Democratic presidential Hillary Clinton and Republican ticket Donald Trump are political “dinosaurs" and vows to dismantle America’s two-party political system.
In an interview with CBS News aired on Sunday night, Johnson said, "I'm not going to lose one minute of sleep ruining this two-party monopoly that is going on.”
"I think they are dinosaurs, and I think we're the comet in this whole equation. And I'm glad for it. I'm proud of it," he said.
"I do believe this is going to be the demise of the Republican Party," the former New Mexico governor predicted.
Johnson said he and his running mate, former Massachusetts governor Bill Weld, could win in November since the 2016 election cycle might produce an unexpected result, adding they wouldn't be running if they didn't see victory as a possibility.
Weld said “it's something of a patriotic duty given how the election season is unfolding. We feel a responsibility to offer the country sort of a sober, sensible alternative.” 
US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump (right) and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton

The US Commission on Presidential Debates announced on Friday that Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein will not participate in the September 26 debate because they failed to garner the 15 percent support in five polls required to qualify for the debate.
Weld said regardless of whether or not they're on the debate stage they would still influence the November election.
"We're going to alter the course of this election, whether or not we're in the debates," he said. "And I think someone trying to guess what that influence is going to be, that's very hard, very hard to predict."
In an interview with Press TV on Saturday, a Green Party candidate for Congress said the US election process is undemocratic because it is unresponsive to the electorate's priorities.
“The US touts itself as the greatest democracy on the planet yet has one of the most undemocratic election processes possible,” he said.
The analyst said “the opportunity to represent the masses of people does not exist. There is the pretense of exposure for candidates but in the end, the system is rigged to deny all but those who adhere to an imperialist, capitalist agenda to win.”