US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton waves after speaking during a fundraiser at the Paramount Theater on October 14, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. (Photos by AFP)

A group of 70 Noble Prize winners have thrown their support behind the US Democratic presidential nominee, endorsing Hillary Clinton for presidency in the run-up to the 2016 elections.
In an open letter on Tuesday, the world’s leading experts in science, medicine and economics “strongly and fully” backed the former secretary of state, arguing that her election is crucial for preserving freedom, safeguarding national security and protecting a constitutional government.
“It is imperative that Hillary Clinton be elected as the next president of the United States,” they wrote.
“We need a president who will support and advance policies that will enable science and technology to flourish in our country and to provide the basis of important policy decisions,” the laureates added.
The letter made no mention of Clinton’s Republican rival, Donald Trump, but it suggested that policies that show a lack of appreciation for scientific knowledge could harm America’s national security.
The signatories of the letter, among whom were prominent names such as  chemist Peter Agre,  economist Robert J. Shiller and  physicist Robert Woodrow Wilson, also pointed to global issues, including cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and climate change as problems that require innovation and investment.

US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump addresses supporters during a campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colorado on October 18, 2016.
Along with other GOPers, Trump believes that the climate change issue is just a "hoax."
According to The New York Times, "The fact that the Nobel laureates are backing Mrs. Clinton does not come as a big surprise, as academics overwhelmingly tend to lean Democratic."
The race between Trump and Clinton represents a battle between two of the least liked major party candidates in US history.
A Washington Post/ABC News poll released in August found Clinton and Trump were the most unpopular presidential candidates in decades.