US President Barack Obama waves to the crowd with Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth (R) during an event in Chicago, Illinois, October 9, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
US President Barack Obama has blasted Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for his “disturbing” remarks about women.
The president made the remarks Sunday, as he addressed a campaign event in Chicago for Democratic Representative Tammy Duckworth, who is running for the Senate.
"One of the most disturbing things about this election is just the unbelievable rhetoric coming at the top of the Republican ticket," Obama said in a reference to Trump’s lewd remarks in a 2005 video that was released this weekend. "I don't need to repeat it, there are children in the room."
Despite issuing an apology on Saturday, the comments pushed the Trump campaign into a crisis just a day before a pivotal second presidential debate between Trump and his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.
Senior Republican figures like Senator John McCain, House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blasted Trump and withdrawn their endorsements following the leak.
The issue was at the center of attention during the incendiary debate, but Trump brushed off his obscene language as “locker room talk.”
Clinton, on the other hand, rejected Trump’s defense, saying the vulgar comments reflect “who Donald Trump is” and what he “thinks about women, what he does to women.”
Obama echoed that view in his speech, saying the Republican candidate has directed such rhetoric not only against women, but also against Muslims, immigrants, veterans and minorities.
“It tells you that he's insecure enough that he pumps himself up by putting other people down. Not a character trait that I would advise for somebody in the Oval Office,” Obama said.
“Are we really going to risk giving Donald Trump the majority he needs to roll back all the progress we've made over the last eight years?” the president asked.
Following the release of the tape, Tramp came under pressure from both sides of the aisle to drop out of the race.
However, the defiant businessman did not bow to the pressure and managed to get past the issue by a relatively strong showing during the debate.
Although the fiasco elicited generally negative reactions among party leaders, the majority of Republican voters continued to express support for Trump, according to a new poll.
The Politico/Morning Consult poll released Sunday, showed that 74 percent of the voters still wanted Trump to run for the White House.