WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange comes out on the balcony of the Ecuadorian embassy to address the media in central London. (File photo by AFP)
Whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks has canceled a major announcement about US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, citing “security concerns.”
Julian Assange, the website’s founder who has long taken refuge at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, was supposed to make the announcement from the embassy’s balcony on Tuesday.
However, NBC News reporter James Rodriguez said in a tweet on Sunday night that the event has been called off.
“Due to security concerns at the Ecuadorian Embassy, Julian Assange's balcony announcement on Tuesday has been canceled, per @wikiLeaks,” he said.
Assange’s group has leaked nearly 20,000 emails from the Democratic National Committee (DNC) over the last months, uncovering an insider effort within the Democratic Party to rig the primary campaign against Clinton’s rival, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (Photo by AFP)
The revelation triggered a political firestorm and resulted in the resignation of DNC chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz after a fierce infighting in the party.
The emails also led to a surge of tensions between Russia and the US, with the latter accusing Moscow of trying to intervene in America’s internal matters.
The new announcement, however, was reportedly much bigger and could have changed the state of the race forever.
Roger Stone, a supporter of Republican nominee Donald Trump, said in a tweet on Sunday morning that Clinton would be "done" because of the announcement.
It was not immediately clear whether WikiLeaks would reschedule.
Clinton’s campaign has been hit with many controversies since its inception in the early 2015.
She came under bipartisan fire and underwent a long-running federal investigation for using a private server to exchange thousands of job-related emails during her tenure as secretary of state.
The former first lady has also been accused of running a cash-for-influence scheme at the Clinton Foundation, which was founded in 2001 by former president Bill Clinton.
The foundation claims it is working to solve a range of issues from health and wellness to gender inequality across the world, but evidence suggests that the Clintons have used their authority to do political favors for some of the top donors of their family organization.