‘We won’t return’, abducted Chibok girls in new Boko Haram video

January 16, 2018 8:46 am

Terrorist group, Boko Haram on Monday released a new video showing remaining schoolgirls abducted four years ago from Chibok, Borno State.

The video is the first since May last year when another woman who also claimed to be among the 219 seized from the town in Borno state said she wanted to stay.

It was not clear when or where the latest video was recorded and The Nation is unable to verified the video released by Saharareporters.
A group of about 12 girls and young women, some of whom are holding babies, are seen in the video.


“We are the Chibok girls, you have been crying we should be released. But by the grace of Allah, we will not return home,” one of the girls said in the released video.
“These people are taking care of us and we are grateful to them. We are happy here – we have found our faith,” she added.
The video also paraded some women believed to be police officers who were abducted in June 2017, the women sobbed as a Boko Haram speaker recited the Qur’an before asking some of them to speak on video.

Shekau also in the video claimed responsibility for the downing of a Nigerian air force helicopter on January 5. A part wreckage of a helicopter is also shown in the footage .
“I am not wounded, I am ready to fight and will continue to fight,”  he said as he read from a prepared speech in  Hausa and flanked left and right by well-armed lieutenants.
Boko Haram seized 276 students from the Government Girls Secondary School in the mostly Christian town on April 14, 2014, triggering global condemnation.


Fifty-nine of them managed to escape in the hours that followed. A campaign for the release of their classmates has had the support of Hollywood stars to global leaders.
A total of 107 girls have now been either found, rescued or released as part of government negotiations with the Islamic State group affiliate.

They have now returned to the northeast and are back in education at the American University of Nigeria, in the Adamawa state capital, Yola.
On January 4, the Nigerian army said it had rescued another of the girls’ classmates in the Pulka region of Borno, near the border with Cameroon.
Boko Haram has used kidnapping as a weapon of war in the conflict, which has killed at least 20,000 people in northeast Nigeria and displaced more than 2.6 million.
Thousands of women and young girls have been seized and held hostage, including as sex slaves, while men and young boys have been forcibly recruited to fight alongside the militants.

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